December 11, 2021

S2 EP9: Michael Hinojosa

During the 2020-2021 school year, a group of students from Sunset High School's Mexican American Studies course partnered with the Dallas Mexican American Historical League to record the narratives of immigrants and migrants from Oak Cliff.

 

Dr. Michael Hinojosa, an Oak Cliff Native, will be in conversation with Adan Gonzalez (Puede Network) sharing his connections to the Oak Cliff Neighborhood and the impact it had on his trajectory. 

Dr. Michael Hinojosa has served over 26 years as a superintendent/CEO of six public education systems, including two of the 25 largest school systems in America, Dallas ISD in Texas and the Cobb County School District in suburban Atlanta, Georgia. His career in public education, from teacher and coach to superintendent/CEO, spans more than four decades.

 

This project is supported by funding from the Institute for Diversity and Civic Life, made possible by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

 

To support the ongoing production costs and labor that goes into this podcast, please consider becoming a member of DMAHL. You can sign up for membership HERE. Or make a donation of your choosing HERE.  

 

For resources about this episode or past episodes, go here: dmahl.org 

 

Follow The Dallas Mexican American Historical League On Social Media at:

Twitter.com/dmahlofficial

Instagram.com/dmahlofficial

Facebook: https://bit.ly/30fGhSQ

Join Dr. Andrew Sandoval-Strausz as he speaks to the continued importance of his work "Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City." The compelling history of how Latino immigrants revitalized the nation’s cities after decades of disinvestment and white flight.

A. K. Sandoval-Strausz is Director of Latino Studies and Associate Professor of History at Penn State University. He was born in New York City to immigrant parents, went uptown to college at Columbia University, and then on to the University of Chicago for his PhD. He teaches courses in Latino studies, immigration history, and urban history, and his research has explored mobility, migration, and immigration. He is the author of Hotel: An American History (Yale University Press), Making Cities Global: The Transnational Turn in Urban History (University of Pennsylvania Press), and most recently Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City (Basic Books), which won the Caroline Bancroft History Prize and was a finalist for the Victor Villaseñor Book Award.

This project is supported by funding from the Institute for Diversity and Civic Life, made possible by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

 

To support the ongoing production costs and labor that goes into this podcast, please consider becoming a member of DMAHL. You can sign up for membership HERE. Or make a donation of your choosing HERE.  

 

For resources about this episode or past episodes, go here: dmahl.org 

 

Follow The Dallas Mexican American Historical League On Social Media at:

Twitter.com/dmahlofficial

Instagram.com/dmahlofficial

Facebook: https://bit.ly/30fGhSQ

Jennifer Rangel, MCRP, Emerging Historian and Board Member of DMAHL as she moderates the Community Involvement Panel featuring Yolanda Alameda, Juan Contreras and Giovanni Valderas. Panelists will share their community involvement journey and recommendations on how people can get involved in their community.

 

Yolanda is a life-long resident of Oak Cliff, she attended Peeler Elementary, Greiner Middle School and graduated from Adamson High School a long time ago. She has over twenty-five years of experience in arts management, community development and program delivery. Yolanda served as Director of the Museums and Cultural Affairs Department for the city of El Paso and as Assistant Director of the Office of Cultural Affairs for the city of Dallas. She now focuses her efforts on health promotion as a certified wellness coach and as a Wellness Resource Consultant for Gruma Corporation and United Healthgroup. Yolanda holds a BA in Psychology and Criminal Justice from the University of North Texas, and a Master's in Public Administration from Rutgers. A life-long learner, she is currently working on a Master’s in Social Work and Public Health. Her volunteer work is hyper-local, she volunteers with the Polk-Vernon Neighborhood Association, Somos Tejas, the West Oak Cliff Coalition, and the Coalition for Self-Determination. She is also the Democratic Precinct Chair for her area. In all her endeavors, she is committed to influencing individual and community transformation and efforts that improve the human condition.

 

Juan Contreras is a Operations Analyst for Bank of America, who also co-chairs their Employee Resource Group (ERG) in North Texas; Hispanic/Latino Organization for Leadership & Advancement (HOLA), which helps promote employee growth, engagement, and fosters local partnerships with organizations in the region. After spending over a decade in civic engagement during his free time as a volunteer with the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), Juan knows the importance of being involved in his local community. In 2014, Juan co-founded Texas Latino Pride, an annual gathering of celebration becoming a unique space of culture, welcoming the LGBTQIA+ Hispanic/LatinX communities, while also raising funds for local agencies. In addition to his community involvement, Juan has co-chaired the national Latinx institute at Creating Change and continuously advocates for basic humane rights for members of the LGBTQIA+ and immigrant communities. Juan studied at El Centro College for Culinary Arts & applied his studies to help his family's taquerias in the Dallas/Metro area.

 

A native of Dallas, Giovanni Valderas is an Assistant Professor of Art at Texas Woman’s University in Denton. Previously, he was the Exhibition Manager at the Fort Worth Community Arts Center and Assistant Gallery Director at Kirk Hopper Fine Art, he began his career as the Gallery Director at Mountain View College. In addition, Valderas served as an appointee by Dallas City Council as Vice Chair of the Cultural Affairs Commission. Valderas graduated from the College of Visual Arts & Design at the University of North Texas with a Master of Fine Arts in Drawing & Painting. He has taught painting and drawing courses at the University of North Texas, Richland, and Mountain View College. He is a former member of 500x gallery, one of the oldest co-op galleries in Texas. His work has been featured in the 2013 Texas Biennial, New American Paintings Magazine, issue #108 and #132, Impossible Geometries: Curated works by Lauren Haynes at Field Projects in New York City, and 14x48.org’s temporary billboard public art project. In addition, Valderas received the Moss/Chumley Award and a micro-grant from the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas for his guerrilla site-specific projects. In 2018, Valderas resigned from his reappointment to the City of Dallas, Cultural Affairs Commission having served under Councilman Omar Narvaez to run for Dallas City Council to represent the neighborhood he grew up in. Valderas led a grassroots campaign where he placed a strong second.

 

This project is supported by funding from the Institute for Diversity and Civic Life, made possible by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

 

To support the ongoing production costs and labor that goes into this podcast, please consider becoming a member of DMAHL. You can sign up for membership HERE. Or make a donation of your choosing HERE.  

 

For resources about this episode or past episodes, go here: dmahl.org 

 

Follow The Dallas Mexican American Historical League On Social Media at:

Twitter.com/dmahlofficial

Instagram.com/dmahlofficial

Facebook: https://bit.ly/30fGhSQ

December 11, 2021

S2 EP6: Sandra Avalos

Sandra Esther Avalos Ortega. Born in Michoacán, Mexico, Sandra Esther Avalos Ortega came to the U.S. in 1996 at a young age. Even before she received protections through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals* (DACA) program, Sandra dedicated herself to empowering disadvantaged youth in her home city of Dallas, Texas. She entered the advocacy space to fight for the rights and safety of immigrant families like hers and to ensure that all people in the Lone Star State can live long, happy, and prosperous lives.

In border states like Texas, immigrants and their families are often the backbones of their communities, but they are frequently the targets of persecution by local politicians and police, making them feel unsafe. In response to this maltreatment, young immigrants and allies have formed local networks to defend immigrants’ rights, meet the needs of their own communities, and join together against attacks on their well-being. In that spirit, Sandra joined a group of young immigrant activists in the Dallas area known as the North Texas Dream Team*. Today, as the group’s vice president, Sandra is helping lead their efforts to empower immigrant communities in the north Texas area—providing legal defense and financial assistance to those in need and holding state and local leaders accountable through mass mobilization.

Sandra is a Millennial and self-proclaimed powerful, unapologetic Latina who fights to empower her community—especially young immigrants. She’s also the proud mother of a ten-year-old daughter, Judith, who shares her mother’s activist spirit.

 

This project is supported by funding from the Institute for Diversity and Civic Life, made possible by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

 

To support the ongoing production costs and labor that goes into this podcast, please consider becoming a member of DMAHL. You can sign up for membership HERE. Or make a donation of your choosing HERE.  

 

For resources about this episode or past episodes, go here: dmahl.org 

 

Follow The Dallas Mexican American Historical League On Social Media at:

Twitter.com/dmahlofficial

Instagram.com/dmahlofficial

Facebook: https://bit.ly/30fGhSQ

December 11, 2021

S2 EP5: Jonathan Angulo

Jonathan Angulo is currently a Ph.D. candidate at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. His research focuses on the history of the Imperial and Mexicali Valley in the California Borderlands, which he grew up in. He observes how immigration and the intersection between the formal and gig economy affected the Asian and Mexican communities along the U.S.-Mexico borderlands between 1917 and 1980. He enjoys participating in oral history projects because they help create records from the perspective of often neglected populations. He currently serves as a board member for the Dallas Mexican American Historical League and the Hispanic Alumni of SMU. 

This project is supported by funding from the Institute for Diversity and Civic Life, made possible by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

 

To support the ongoing production costs and labor that goes into this podcast, please consider becoming a member of DMAHL. You can sign up for membership HERE. Or make a donation of your choosing HERE.  

 

For resources about this episode or past episodes, go here: dmahl.org 

 

Follow The Dallas Mexican American Historical League On Social Media at:

Twitter.com/dmahlofficial

Instagram.com/dmahlofficial

Facebook: https://bit.ly/30fGhSQ

December 11, 2021

S2 EP4: Jodi Voice Yellowfish

Jodi Voice Yellowfish is Muscogee Creek, Oglala Lakota, and Cherokee. Born and raised in Dallas, Texas. Jodi is a product of the US. Government's Relocation Program. She attended Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, Kansas where she received her Associate's degree in Social Work and studied for her bachelors degree in Indigenous and American Indian Studies. Jodi is the Chair for MMIW TX - Rematriate (Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women), on the Steering Committee for Dallas Truth Racial Healing Transformation, and was recently selected to be a Commissioner on the Arts and Culture Advisory Commission for the City of Dallas. She is also a wife and an adoptive parent to her niece and two nephews.

This project is supported by funding from the Institute for Diversity and Civic Life, made possible by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

 

To support the ongoing production costs and labor that goes into this podcast, please consider becoming a member of DMAHL. You can sign up for membership HERE. Or make a donation of your choosing HERE.  

 

For resources about this episode or past episodes, go here: dmahl.org 

 

Follow The Dallas Mexican American Historical League On Social Media at:

Twitter.com/dmahlofficial

Instagram.com/dmahlofficial

Facebook: https://bit.ly/30fGhSQ

December 11, 2021

S2 EP3: Noah Macias

In this episode of the chronicles of Dallas Barrios podcast Joven Historian Noah Macias interviews his grandmother, sharing the story of how she came to Oak Cliff. Later a few of the emerging historians will discuss topics related to immmigration / migration in the US

 

During the 2020-2021 school year, a group of students from Sunset High School's Mexican American Studies course partnered with the Dallas Mexican American Historical League to record the narratives of immigrants and migrants from Oak Cliff.

Noah Macias, a then high school student at Sunset High School, in Oak Cliff, Dallas, Texas and Joven Historian of DMAHL, interviews his Grandmother, sharing the story of how she came to Oak Cliff. We would like to provide a warning for this episode. Noah’s Grandmother says a word that has been used in the past to describe people with an intellectual disability in order to inflict exclusion. This was something that at the time people wouldn’t bat an eye at, but since this word equates intellectual disabilities with being dumb or stupid it will not be inlcuded in the episode, and is now considered hate speech. DMAHL appreciates the value in sharing hard truths and the importance of acknowledging how people were treated in the past because those values are still reverberating around our society and impacting the present day. With that context please listen with compassion and a curiosity to learn about people in their uniqueness despite stereotypes. 

This project is supported by funding from the Institute for Diversity and Civic Life, made possible by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

 

To support the ongoing production costs and labor that goes into this podcast, please consider becoming a member of DMAHL. You can sign up for membership HERE. Or make a donation of your choosing HERE.  

 

For resources about this episode or past episodes, go here: dmahl.org 

 

Follow The Dallas Mexican American Historical League On Social Media at:

Twitter.com/dmahlofficial

Instagram.com/dmahlofficial

Facebook: https://bit.ly/30fGhSQ

December 11, 2021

S2 EP2: Olimpia Godoy

During the 2020-2021 school year, a group of students from Sunset High School's Mexican American Studies course partnered with the Dallas Mexican American Historical League to record the narratives of immigrants and migrants from Oak Cliff.

Olimpia Godoy is a student at Sunset High School and Joven Historian. She conducts two Spanish interviews of people who share their stories of migration. 

This project is supported by funding from the Institute for Diversity and Civic Life, made possible by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

 

To support the ongoing production costs and labor that goes into this podcast, please consider becoming a member of DMAHL. You can sign up for membership HERE. Or make a donation of your choosing HERE.  

 

For resources about this episode or past episodes, go here: dmahl.org 

 

Follow The Dallas Mexican American Historical League On Social Media at:

Twitter.com/dmahlofficial

Instagram.com/dmahlofficial

Facebook: https://bit.ly/30fGhSQ

During the 2020-2021 school year, a group of students from Sunset High School's Mexican American Studies course partnered with the Dallas Mexican American Historical League to record the narratives of immigrants and migrants from Oak Cliff.
 
In this episode, the students provide a brief overview of Season 2 of the Chronicles of Dallas Barrios Podcast. Join Olimpia, Juana, and Nelyda (Our Joven Historians) in a platica over the production of this podcast and their experience in a Mexican American Studies course. 
 
This project is supported by funding from the Institute for Diversity and Civic Life, made possible by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.
 

To support the ongoing production costs and labor that goes into this podcast, please consider becoming a member of DMAHL. You can sign up for membership HERE. Or make a donation of your choosing HERE.  

 

For resources about this episode or past episodes, go here: dmahl.org 

 

Follow The Dallas Mexican American Historical League On Social Media at:

Twitter.com/dmahlofficial

Instagram.com/dmahlofficial

Facebook: https://bit.ly/30fGhSQ

December 14, 2020

EP 8: Ellen Hoffman

Welcome to the Chronicles of Dallas Barrios Podcast! 

 

Join us for a conversion with Ellen Hoffman! 

 

Ellen Hoffman is the Owner and Chief Experience Officer for The Movement Loft, a studio specializing in movement disciplines that provide positive benefits to students' bodies and mind. Ellen's chief focus is on creating opportunities for the community to find wellness, connecting the mind and body, while enjoying the benefits of physical movement. The Movement Loft provides daily yoga, dance, movement and meditation experiences for practitioners of various levels, with an emphasis on choice, accessibility and self-care. 

 

As a mixed, Latinx female business owner, she is passionate about championing other women, in particular women of color, to live their best lives. She herself upholds these principles by practicing and promoting self-awareness and self-care, relationship-building, community development, and work in health and wellness. You can learn more about The Movement Loft at www.movementloftstudios.com  

 

Follow/Support our guest on Social Media at:

https://www.movementloftstudios.com // @movementloft // @mostinterestingellen

 

To support the ongoing production costs and labor that goes into this podcast, please consider becoming a member of DMAHL. You can sign up for membership HERE. Or make a donation of your choosing HERE.  

 

For resources about this episode or past episodes, go here: dmahl.org 

 

Follow The Dallas Mexican American Historical League On Social Media at:

Twitter.com/dmahlofficial

Instagram.com/dmahlofficial

Facebook: https://bit.ly/30fGhSQ

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